Education after COVID-19 – Issue 8 – The role of the arts and creativity

Press/Media: Expert Comment

Description

Educationalist and author Sir Ken Robinson died on 21 August 2020. Well into his career as an education researcher and policy advisor, in 2006 he was made world famous for his provocative argument that schools kill children's creativity and need to be reformed. In commemoration, this week's issue is devoted to the role of the arts and creativity in giving students the skills and resilience to cope with the pandemic and to face the challenges that will follow in its wake.

Subject

Dr Sarah Powell, Macquarie University – "Educating for creativity means equipping children with the capacity to deal with whatever the future throws at them." 
Dr Sarah Powell is a Lecturer in Creative Arts at Macquarie University, with research in music and movement education. She says that the arts and creativity provide critical skills for dealing with an uncertain future.

"Now more than ever we need creative people," says Dr Powell. "Sir Ken Robinson knew this and advocated for schools to nurture creativity in our children, preparing them for the unknown and the unpredictable. How do we prepare children for a future scarred by the turmoil of COVID? Creativity is the answer.   

"When children are engaged in the Creative Arts, especially music, they are engaged in deep learning. They learn to think differently and critically. They learn to represent thoughts, ideas, experiences, and feelings in diverse ways. They learn to experiment and try new things, becoming comfortable with making 'mistakes’. The arts help children collaborate, negotiate, reflect, and plan." 

Such expression is critical to individual and collective wellbeing. Music, for example, makes people feel good, and is an outlet for healthy communication and expression. Shared experiences are especially important and have a significant, positive impact on people.

"Musical groups (choirs, bands) offer a collective experience, fostering connectedness, empathy, social and emotional wellbeing. Without these opportunities our children’s mental health now and into the future is seriously jeopardised.

"Educating for creativity means equipping children with the capacity to deal with whatever the future throws at them." 

Period31 Aug 2020

Media contributions

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Media contributions

  • TitleEDUCATION AFTER COVID-19: ISSUE EIGHT THE ROLE OF THE ARTS AND CREATIVITY
    Degree of recognitionNational
    Media name/outletMCERA
    Media typeWeb
    CountryAustralia
    Date31/08/20
    DescriptionCOVID-19 has profoundly disrupted education. Instead of merely reacting to this disruption and attempting to create an illusion of normality, it is important to reflect carefully on how educators and policymakers can respond effectively, learn from the pandemic, and improve the education system in lasting ways.
    To this end, we are issuing a weekly series, in which we invite experts to provide their insights on the things that can and should change for the better in education both during the pandemic and after.
    Educationalist and author Sir Ken Robinson died on 21 August 2020. Well into his career as an education researcher and policy advisor, in 2006 he was made world famous for his provocative argument that schools kill children's creativity and need to be reformed. In commemoration, this week's issue is devoted to the role of the arts and creativity in giving students the skills and resilience to cope with the pandemic and to face the challenges that will follow in its wake.
    PersonsSarah Powell