Fossils From Some of the Last Homo Erectus Hint at the End of the Long-Lived Species

Press/Media: Research

Description

Homo erectus was a very successful early human, spreading across the ancient world and surviving Earth’s changing environments for nearly two million years—at least five times longer than our own species has been around. Now scientists may have pinpointed where and when Homo erectus made a final stand. The youngest known fossils of the long-lived species
were identified on the Indonesian island of Java, where a dozen skulls found before World War II have finally been definitively dated to between 108,000 and 117,000 years ago.

Period18 Dec 2019

Media contributions

1

Media contributions

  • TitleFossils From Some of the Last Homo Erectus Hint at the End of the Long-Lived Species
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletSmithsonian.com
    Media typeWeb
    CountryUnited States
    Date18/12/19
    DescriptionHomo erectus was a very successful early human, spreading across the ancient world and surviving Earth’s changing environments for nearly two million years—at least five times longer than our own species has been around. Now scientists may have pinpointed where and when Homo erectus made a final stand. The youngest known fossils of the long-lived species
    were identified on the Indonesian island of Java, where a dozen skulls found before World War II have finally been definitively dated to between 108,000 and 117,000 years ago.
    Producer/AuthorBrian Handwerk
    URLsmithsonian.com
    PersonsKira Westaway