Fossils rewrite story of human settlement in southeast Asia

Press/Media: Research

Description

Humans lived on Sumatra 20,000 years earlier than previously thought and
were sophisticated rainforest dwellers, according to re-analysis of fossil teeth
from a lost cave.

Period9 Aug 2017 → 14 Aug 2017

Media contributions

5

Media contributions

  • TitleFossils rewrite story of human settlement in southeast Asia
    Degree of recognitionNational
    Media name/outletCosmos Magazine
    Media typePrint
    CountryAustralia
    Date14/08/17
    DescriptionHumans lived on Sumatra 20,000 years earlier than previously thought and were sophisticated rainforest dwellers, according to re-analysis of fossil teeth from a lost cave.
    Producer/AuthorAndrew Masterton
    URLhttps://cosmosmagazine.com/archaeology/fossils-rewrite-story-of-human-settlement-in-southeast-asia
    PersonsKira Westaway
  • TitleHumans were in Indonesia more than 63,000 years ago
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletArs Technica
    Media typeWeb
    CountryUnited States
    Date12/08/17
    DescriptionIn the Padang Highlands of western Sumatra, a large island in Indonesia, there is a small cave called Lida Ajer that has long offered up clues about human history. Dutch paleoanthropologist Eugene Dubois first excavated the cave before 1890, and Lida Ajer has turned up plenty of preserved animal remains since, including teeth that were identified as human in 1948.
    It’s only now that the cave has been carefully and thoroughly dated, providing a new line of evidence that our species was in the region more than 60,000 years ago.
    Producer/AuthorCathleen O'Grady
    URLhttps://arstechnica.com/science/2017/08/humans-were-in-indonesia-more-than-63000-years-ago/
    PersonsKira Westaway
  • TitleHumans lived in Indonesia’s rainforests more than 70,000 years ago
    Degree of recognitionNational
    Media name/outletAustralian Geographic
    Media typeWeb
    CountryAustralia
    Date10/08/17
    DescriptionHuman incursions into Southeast Asia may have occurred more than 20,000 years earlier than previously thought.
    Producer/AuthorKarl Gruber
    PersonsKira Westaway
  • TitleArrival of modern humans in Southeast Asia questioned
    Degree of recognitionNational
    Media name/outletScience Daily
    Media typeWeb
    CountryAustralia
    Date10/08/17
    DescriptionHumans may have exited out of Africa and arrived in Southeast Asia 20,000 years earlier than previously thought, a new
    study involving University of Queensland researchers suggests.
    Findings from the Macquarie University-led study also suggest humans could have potentially made the crossing to Australia even earlier than the accepted 60,000 to 65,000 years ago.
    URLhttps://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/08/170810104931.htm
    PersonsKira Westaway
  • TitleEarly humans may have seen a supervolcano explosion up close
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletNew Scientist Magazine
    Media typePrint
    CountryUnited States
    Date9/08/17
    DescriptionTwo ancient teeth found in an Indonesian cave hint that our species had arrived there as early as 73,000 years ago – and may have had to deal with the biggest supervolcano eruption of the last few million years and also adapt to the challenges of living in thick rainforest.
    Many archaeologists were puzzled by the recent discovery of 65,000-year-old stone tools and other artefacts in northern Australia. According to traditional thinking, early members of our species, Homo sapiens, were just beginning to venture out of Africa at this time.
    Producer/AuthorAlice Klein
    URLhttps://www.newscientist.com/article/2142952-early-humans-may-have-seen-a-supervolcano-explosion-up-close/
    PersonsKira Westaway