Homo erectus: Ancient humans survived longer than we thought

Press/Media: Research

Description

An ancient relative of modern humans survived into comparatively recent times in
South East Asia, a new study has revealed.
Homo erectus evolved around two million years ago, and was the first known human species
to walk fully upright.
New dating evidence shows that it survived until just over 100,000 years ago on the
Indonesian island of Java - long after it had vanished elsewhere.
This means it was still around when our own species was walking the Earth.

Period18 Dec 2019

Media contributions

1

Media contributions

  • TitleHomo erectus: Ancient humans survived longer than we thought
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletBBC news website
    Media typeWeb
    CountryUnited Kingdom
    Date18/12/19
    DescriptionAn ancient relative of modern humans survived into comparatively recent times in South East Asia, a new study has revealed. Homo erectus evolved around two million years ago, and was the first known human species to walk fully upright.
    New dating evidence shows that it survived until just over 100,000 years ago on the Indonesian island of Java - long after it had vanished elsewhere. This means it was still around when our own species was walking the Earth.
    Producer/AuthorPaul Rincon
    URLhttps://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-50827603
    PersonsKira Westaway