Java Man's last stand

Press/Media: Research

Description

The disputed age of the youngest known Homo erectus remains on the Indonesian
island of Java has been revised, effectively ruling out any overlap between the
archaic human species and anatomically modern humans.
The bones in question – 12 skull caps and two lower leg bones – were discovered
in the 1930s by Dutch explorers near the Solo River at Ngandong in Central Java.
Ngandong sits just 10 kilometres from Trinil, the site where Eugène Dubois
unearthed the very first fossils of Homo erectus – then dubbed Java Man [1] – in
1891. At the time, Java Man was proclaimed as a “missing link” between apes and
humans.

Period18 Dec 2019

Media contributions

1

Media contributions

  • TitleJava Man's last stand
    Degree of recognitionNational
    Media name/outletComos magazine
    Media typePrint
    CountryAustralia
    Date18/12/19
    DescriptionThe disputed age of the youngest known Homo erectus remains on the Indonesian island of Java has been revised, effectively ruling out any overlap between the archaic human species and anatomically modern humans. The bones in question – 12 skull caps and two lower leg bones – were discovered in the 1930s by Dutch explorers near the Solo River at Ngandong in Central Java. Ngandong sits just 10 kilometres from Trinil, the site where Eugène Dubois unearthed the very first fossils of Homo erectus – then dubbed Java Man [1] – in 1891. At the time, Java Man was proclaimed as a “missing link” between apes and humans.
    Producer/AuthorDyani Lewis
    PersonsKira Westaway