Scientists narrow age estimate for fossils of human ancestor

Press/Media: Research

Description

Scientists say they have finally calculated
the age of the youngest known remains of Homo erectus, which
is generally considered an ancestor of our species.
The fossilized skull fragments and other bones were uncovered
on the Indonesian island of Java in the 1930s. Determining
their age has been a scientific challenge, and a wide range has
been proposed by numerous studies.
In a report released Wednesday by the journal Nature,
scientists conclude the remains are between 108,000 and
117,000 years old. Researchers used five dating techniques on
sediments and fossil animal bones from the area, combining 52
age estimates for the analysis. The project took 13 years to
complete.

Period19 Dec 2019

Media contributions

1

Media contributions

  • TitleScientists narrow age estimate for fossils of human ancestor
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletAssociated Press
    Media typeWeb
    CountryUnited States
    Date19/12/19
    DescriptionNEW YORK (AP) — Scientists say they have finally calculated
    the age of the youngest known remains of Homo erectus, which
    is generally considered an ancestor of our species.
    The fossilized skull fragments and other bones were uncovered
    on the Indonesian island of Java in the 1930s. Determining
    their age has been a scientific challenge, and a wide range has
    been proposed by numerous studies.
    In a report released Wednesday by the journal Nature,
    scientists conclude the remains are between 108,000 and
    117,000 years old. Researchers used five dating techniques on
    sediments and fossil animal bones from the area, combining 52
    age estimates for the analysis. The project took 13 years to
    complete.
    Producer/AuthorMalcolm Ritter
    PersonsKira Westaway