Scientists Shed New Light On The Last Holdout Of An Extinct Human Species

Press/Media: Research

Description

Using modern dating techniques, scientists have dramatically narrowed the age of Homo erectus fossils found in Java during the early 1930s. Conxrmed as the youngest known Homo erectus fossils, they’re providing critically important insights into the final chapter of these archaic humans. By the time our species emerged in Africa some 300,000 years ago, a separate human species had been wandering this good Earth for well over a million years. Such is the incredible story of Homo erectus, one of the most successful hominins to have ever lived. These archaic humans boasted the largest geographical spread of any hominin until we came along, a range that included Africa, China, India, Europe, and Java.

Period19 Dec 2019

Media contributions

1

Media contributions

  • TitleScientists Shed New Light On The Last Holdout Of An Extinct Human Species
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletGizmodo
    Media typeWeb
    CountryUnited States
    Date19/12/19
    DescriptionUsing modern dating techniques, scientists have dramatically narrowed the age of Homo erectus fossils found in Java during the early 1930s. Conxrmed as the youngest known Homo erectus fossils, they’re providing critically important insights into the final chapter of these archaic humans. By the time our species emerged in Africa some 300,000 years ago, a separate human species had been wandering this good Earth for well over a million years. Such is the incredible story of Homo erectus, one of the most successful hominins to have ever lived. These archaic humans boasted the largest geographical spread of any hominin until we came along, a range that included Africa, China, India, Europe, and Java.
    Producer/AuthorGeorge Dvorsky
    URLhttps://www.gizmodo.com.au
    PersonsKira Westaway