Description

Macquarie University researchers have made a single tiny diamond shine brightly at room temperature, a behaviour known as superradiance.This is important because nanodiamonds have the potential to be used in all sorts of devices, such as minute compasses for navigation, in biomedical imaging and to potentially create better solar cells.

Subject

Macquarie University has a strong tradition in diamond materials research with several groups investigating diamond lasers, diamond growth, and nanodiamond processing. There is also a very active group of researchers working on quantum engineering for new technologies with diamond and other systems.

Period31 Oct 2017 → 1 Nov 2017

Media coverage

2

Media coverage

  • TitleAustralian Scientists Changed The Future Of Quantum Technology By Making A Tiny Diamond Super Shiny
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletGizmodo
    Media typeWeb
    CountryAustralia
    Date1/11/17
    DescriptionResearchers at Macquarie University have, for the first time anywhere, ever, managed to make a nanodiamond, one thousand times smaller than a human hair, shine at "superradiant" levels - and it could change the way we approach quantum technology.
    URLhttps://www.gizmodo.com.au/2017/11/australian-scientists-changed-the-future-of-quantum-technology-by-making-a-tiny-diamond-super-shiny/
    PersonsGavin Brennen
  • TitleTiny diamonds light the way for new quantum technologies
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletphys.org
    Media typeWeb
    Date31/10/17
    DescriptionMacquarie University researchers have made a single tiny diamond shine brightly at room temperature, a behaviour known as superradiance.
    This is important because nanodiamonds have the potential to be used in all sorts of devices, such as minute compasses for navigation, in biomedical imaging and to potentially create better solar cells.
    URLhttps://phys.org/news/2017-10-tiny-diamonds-quantum-technologies.html
    PersonsGavin Brennen