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Personal profile

Biography

My interest in perception was stimulated early in life by various visual illusions, and by the discovery that my colour vision was defective. As an undergraduate, I studied Physics at Imperial College, London (UK), before moving to the University of York (UK) to study Psychology where my undergraduate third year project, concerning the relationship between image contrast and perceived speed, was supervised by Dr. Peter Thompson.

At the University of Sussex (UK), I completed my doctoral thesis, entitled Mechanisms of Suprathreshold Stereomotion Perception, under the supervision of Professor George Mather. Following my formal education, I continued my research into the perception of motion in depth as Senior Research Associate at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, (USA) with Dr. Leland Stone.

At the University of New South Wales (Australia), a post-doc with Professor Barbara Gillam allowed me to broaden my interest in depth perception to include issues of unmatched stereopsis. A further post-doctoral appointment to work with Dr. Richard Kemp allowed me to develop a long standing interest in face perception. After a Senior Lectureship at the University of Plymouth (UK), I returned to Australia to my current position.

Research interests

Motion processing, including the perception of speed and direction.

Binocular depth perception, including stereoscopic art, unpaired stereopsis, and the perception of motion in depth (stereomotion).

Face perception, including face matching and recognition.

Body Perception, including body image and the perception and misperception of body size and shape.

Perceptual adaptation and aftereffects.

Teaching

PSY247: Perception I

PSY342: Real World Applications of Perception

PSY463/PSY763: Advanced Visual Perception

Education/Academic qualification

Experimental Psychology, D.Phil., University of Sussex

1 Oct 199530 Sep 1999

Psychology, B.Sc. (Hons), University of York

1 Oct 199230 Jun 1995

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  • 6 Similar Profiles
Cues Medicine & Life Sciences
Body Size Medicine & Life Sciences
Depth Perception Medicine & Life Sciences
Body Image Medicine & Life Sciences
Vision Disparity Medicine & Life Sciences
Motion Perception Medicine & Life Sciences
Research Medicine & Life Sciences
Muscles Medicine & Life Sciences

Network Recent external collaboration on country level. Dive into details by clicking on the dots.

Projects 2009 2020

Research Outputs 2000 2019

Experimental manipulation of visual attention affects body size adaptation but not body dissatisfaction

Stephen, I. D., Hunter, K., Sturman, D., Mond, J., Stevenson, R. J. & Brooks, K. R., Jan 2019, In : International Journal of Eating Disorders. 52, 1, p. 79-87 9 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Body Size
Adiposity
Body Image

Gender and the body size aftereffect: implications for neural processing

Brooks, K. R., Baldry, E., Mond, J., Stevenson, R. J., Mitchison, D. & Stephen, I. D., 18 Oct 2019, In : Frontiers in Neuroscience. 13, p. 1-11 11 p., 1100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Open Access
File
Body Size
Body Image
Anorexia Nervosa
Obesity

Looking at the figures: visual adaptation as a mechanism for body-size and -shape misperception

Brooks, K. R., Mond, J., Mitchison, D., Stevenson, R. J., Challinor, K. L. & Stephen, I. D., 14 Nov 2019, In : Perspectives on Psychological Science. 17 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Body Size
Obesity
Body Image
Adiposity
Human Body

Muscle and fat aftereffects and the role of gender: implications for body image disturbance

Brooks, K. R., Keen, E., Sturman, D., Mond, J., Stevenson, R. J. & Stephen, I. D., 27 Dec 2019, In : British Journal of Psychology. 20 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Body Image
Fats
Muscles
Adipose Tissue
Fat

The thin white line: adaptation suggests a common neural mechanism for judgments of Asian and Caucasian body size

Gould-Fensom, L., Tan, C. B. Y., Brooks, K. R., Mond, J., Stevenson, R. J. & Stephen, I. D., 15 Nov 2019, In : Frontiers in Psychology. 10, p. 1-9 9 p., 2532.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Open Access
File
Body Size
Population

Prizes

Extra Mile Award

Kevin Brooks (Recipient), 2015

Prize

human science
human sciences
Teaching
student
commitment
Teaching
learning
student