A bout of voluntary running enhances context conditioned fear, its extinction, and its reconsolidation

Joyce Siette, Amy C. Reichelt, R. Frederick Westbrook*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)
1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Three experiments used rats to examine the effect of a single bout of voluntary activity (wheel running) on the acquisition, extinction, and reconsolidation of context conditioned fear. In Experiment 1, rats provided with access to a wheel for 3 h immediately before or after a shocked exposure to a context froze more when tested in that context than rats provided with access to the wheels 6 h after the shocked exposure or rats not provided with access to the wheels. In Experiment 2, rats provided with access to the wheels immediately before or after a nonshocked exposure to the conditioned context froze less when tested in that context than rats provided with access to the wheels 6 h after the nonshocked exposure or rats not provided with access to the wheels. In Experiment 3, rats provided with access to wheels immediately after an extended nonshocked exposure to the conditioned context again froze less, whereas rats provided with access to the wheels after a brief nonshocked exposure froze more on the subsequent test than sedentary controls. These results show that a single bout of running can enhance acquisition, extinction, and reconsolidation of context conditioned fear.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)73-81
Number of pages9
JournalLearning and Memory
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2014
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2014. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

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