A comparison of brachial, femoral, and aortic intra-arterial pressures before and after cardiopulmonary bypass

G. P. Gravlee, S. D. Brauer, M. F. O'Rourke, A. P. Avolio

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23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Following recent evidence that brachial and femoral artery pressures are more reliable than radial artery pressures after cardiopulmonary bypass, thirty-one adults had simultaneous pre- and post-bypass measurements of brachial, femoral, and ascending aortic pressures. Two minutes after cardiopulmonary bypass, brachial artery systolic pressure and mean arterial pressure fell significantly below corresponding pressures in the femoral artery and aorta. Five minutes after cardiopulmonary bypass, only brachial artery systolic pressure was still less than femoral and aortic systolic pressures. By ten minutes after bypass, all significant pressure differences had resolved except between brachial and femoral artery systolic pressures. Clinically significant (≥ 5 mmHg) aortic-to-brachial reductions in mean arterial pressures occurred in six (19%) patients at two minutes and in three (10%) patients at five and ten minutes after bypass. Equivalent aortic-to-femoral mean pressure diminution occurred in two (6%) patients at two minutes and one (3%) patient at five and ten minutes after bypass. Neither systemic vascular resistance nor body temperatures contributed significantly to post-bypass central-to-peripheral pressure reductions. Immediately following bypass, femoral artery pressures reproduce central aortic pressures more reliably than do radial or brachial artery pressures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)305-311
Number of pages7
JournalAnaesthesia and Intensive Care
Volume17
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

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