A comparison of Indigenous and non-Indigenous users of MindSpot: an Australian digital mental health service

Nickolai Titov, Carlie Schofield, Lauren Staples, Blake F. Dear, Olav Nielssen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To report on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) users of MindSpot, a national service for the remote assessment and treatment of anxiety and depression. Methods: The characteristics and treatment outcomes of Indigenous patients who registered with MindSpot between January 2015 and December 2016, were compared with non-Indigenous users. Changes in psychological distress, depression and anxiety were measured using the Kessler 10-Item (K-10), Patient Health Questionnaire 9-Item (PHQ-9), and Generalised Anxiety Disorder Scale 7-Item (GAD-7), respectively. Results: Of 23,235 people who completed a MindSpot assessment between 1 January 2015 and 31 December 2016, 780 (3.4%) identified as Indigenous Australian. They had higher symptom scores, were more likely to live in a remote location, and a third reported no previous contact with mental health services. Fewer Indigenous patients enrolled in a treatment course, but those who did had similar rates of completion and similar reductions in symptoms to non-Indigenous patients. Conclusions: MindSpot treatments were effective in treating anxiety and depression in Indigenous Australians, and outcomes were similar to those of non-Indigenous patients. Services like MindSpot are a treatment option that can help overcome barriers to mental health care for Indigenous Australians.

LanguageEnglish
Pages352-357
Number of pages6
JournalAustralasian Psychiatry
Volume27
Issue number4
Early online date1 Jan 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2019

Fingerprint

Mental Health Services
Anxiety
Depression
Therapeutics
Anxiety Disorders
Mental Health
Psychology
Delivery of Health Care
Health

Keywords

  • MindSpot
  • Indigenous Australians
  • rural and remote
  • barriers to care
  • eMental Health

Cite this

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abstract = "Objective: To report on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) users of MindSpot, a national service for the remote assessment and treatment of anxiety and depression. Methods: The characteristics and treatment outcomes of Indigenous patients who registered with MindSpot between January 2015 and December 2016, were compared with non-Indigenous users. Changes in psychological distress, depression and anxiety were measured using the Kessler 10-Item (K-10), Patient Health Questionnaire 9-Item (PHQ-9), and Generalised Anxiety Disorder Scale 7-Item (GAD-7), respectively. Results: Of 23,235 people who completed a MindSpot assessment between 1 January 2015 and 31 December 2016, 780 (3.4{\%}) identified as Indigenous Australian. They had higher symptom scores, were more likely to live in a remote location, and a third reported no previous contact with mental health services. Fewer Indigenous patients enrolled in a treatment course, but those who did had similar rates of completion and similar reductions in symptoms to non-Indigenous patients. Conclusions: MindSpot treatments were effective in treating anxiety and depression in Indigenous Australians, and outcomes were similar to those of non-Indigenous patients. Services like MindSpot are a treatment option that can help overcome barriers to mental health care for Indigenous Australians.",
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A comparison of Indigenous and non-Indigenous users of MindSpot : an Australian digital mental health service. / Titov, Nickolai; Schofield, Carlie; Staples, Lauren; Dear, Blake F.; Nielssen, Olav.

In: Australasian Psychiatry, Vol. 27, No. 4, 01.08.2019, p. 352-357.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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