A comparison of the McGurk effect for spoken and sung syllables

Lena Quinto, William Forde Thompson*, Frank A. Russo, Sandra E. Trehub

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The importance of visual cues in speech perception is illustrated by the McGurk effect, whereby a speaker's facial movements affect speech perception. The goal of the present study was to evaluate whether the McGurk effect is also observed for sung syllables. Participants heard and saw sung instances of the syllables /ba/ and /ga/ and then judged the syllable they perceived. Audio-visual stimuli were congruent or incongruent (e.g., auditory /ba/presented with visual/ga/). The stimuli were presented as spoken, sung in an ascending and descending triad (C E G G E C), and sung in an ascending and descending triad that returned to a semitone above the tonic (C E G G E C#). Results revealed no differences in the proportion of fusion responses between spoken and sung conditions confirming that cross-modal phonemic information is integrated similarly in speech and song.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1450-1454
Number of pages5
JournalAttention, Perception and Psychophysics
Volume72
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2010

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A comparison of the McGurk effect for spoken and sung syllables'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this