A comparison of time estimations in driving with target-only in motion, self-only in motion, and self-and-target in motion

Beryl Hesketh*, Stuart T. Godley

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using an occlusion paradigm, estimates of the time taken to reach a point with the target-only in motion (approaching vehicle judged by a stationary observer), self-only in motion (moving observer judgment of a stationary target), and both self-and-target in motion (moving observer judgment of an approaching vehicle), were contrasted. Judgments were made in built-up urban and textureless rural roadsides and on straight and curved roads. Thirty drivers with an average experience of 3.3 years drove a simulator and estimated when they should have passed vehicles that were occluded when the vehicles were 2.5 sec away. Target-only in motion estimates were more accurate (less underestimated) than self-only and self-and-target in motion estimates, which in turn were more accurate than self-only in motion judgments. The roadside manipulation only influenced estimates when participants were moving. Judgments were more accurate in the urban environment when other vehicles were stationary, but in the rural environment accuracy was greater when the other vehicles were approaching. Self-and-target in motion judgments were less accurate on curves than on straight roads. Possible theoretical explanations for the results are highlighted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)111-125
Number of pages15
JournalEcological Psychology
Volume14
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

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