A complex multi-notch astronomical filter to suppress the bright infrared sky

J. Bland-Hawthorn, S. C. Ellis, S. G. Leon-Saval, R. Haynes, M. M. Roth, H. G. Löhmannsröben, A. J. Horton, J. G. Cuby, T. A. Birks, J. S. Lawrence, P. Gillingham, S. D. Ryder, C. Trinh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

A long-standing and profound problem in astronomy is the difficulty in obtaining deep near-infrared observations due to the extreme brightness and variability of the night sky at these wavelengths. A solution to this problem is crucial if we are to obtain the deepest possible observations of the early Universe, as redshifted starlight from distant galaxies appears at these wavelengths. The atmospheric emission between 1,000 and 1,800 nm arises almost entirely from a forest of extremely bright, very narrow hydroxyl emission lines that varies on timescales of minutes. The astronomical community has long envisaged the prospect of selectively removing these lines, while retaining high throughput between them. Here we demonstrate such a filter for the first time, presenting results from the first on-sky tests. Its use on current 8 m telescopes and future 30 m telescopes will open up many new research avenues in the years to come.

LanguageEnglish
Article number581
Pages1-7
Number of pages7
JournalNature Communications
Volume2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Dec 2011

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Telescopes
notches
sky
hydroxyl emission
Astronomy
Galaxies
telescopes
night sky
Infrared radiation
filters
Wavelength
airglow
retaining
astronomy
wavelengths
Hydroxyl Radical
Luminance
brightness
universe
Throughput

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Bland-Hawthorn, J., Ellis, S. C., Leon-Saval, S. G., Haynes, R., Roth, M. M., Löhmannsröben, H. G., ... Trinh, C. (2011). A complex multi-notch astronomical filter to suppress the bright infrared sky. Nature Communications, 2, 1-7. [581]. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms1584
Bland-Hawthorn, J. ; Ellis, S. C. ; Leon-Saval, S. G. ; Haynes, R. ; Roth, M. M. ; Löhmannsröben, H. G. ; Horton, A. J. ; Cuby, J. G. ; Birks, T. A. ; Lawrence, J. S. ; Gillingham, P. ; Ryder, S. D. ; Trinh, C. / A complex multi-notch astronomical filter to suppress the bright infrared sky. In: Nature Communications. 2011 ; Vol. 2. pp. 1-7.
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abstract = "A long-standing and profound problem in astronomy is the difficulty in obtaining deep near-infrared observations due to the extreme brightness and variability of the night sky at these wavelengths. A solution to this problem is crucial if we are to obtain the deepest possible observations of the early Universe, as redshifted starlight from distant galaxies appears at these wavelengths. The atmospheric emission between 1,000 and 1,800 nm arises almost entirely from a forest of extremely bright, very narrow hydroxyl emission lines that varies on timescales of minutes. The astronomical community has long envisaged the prospect of selectively removing these lines, while retaining high throughput between them. Here we demonstrate such a filter for the first time, presenting results from the first on-sky tests. Its use on current 8 m telescopes and future 30 m telescopes will open up many new research avenues in the years to come.",
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Bland-Hawthorn, J, Ellis, SC, Leon-Saval, SG, Haynes, R, Roth, MM, Löhmannsröben, HG, Horton, AJ, Cuby, JG, Birks, TA, Lawrence, JS, Gillingham, P, Ryder, SD & Trinh, C 2011, 'A complex multi-notch astronomical filter to suppress the bright infrared sky', Nature Communications, vol. 2, 581, pp. 1-7. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms1584

A complex multi-notch astronomical filter to suppress the bright infrared sky. / Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Ellis, S. C.; Leon-Saval, S. G.; Haynes, R.; Roth, M. M.; Löhmannsröben, H. G.; Horton, A. J.; Cuby, J. G.; Birks, T. A.; Lawrence, J. S.; Gillingham, P.; Ryder, S. D.; Trinh, C.

In: Nature Communications, Vol. 2, 581, 06.12.2011, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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Bland-Hawthorn J, Ellis SC, Leon-Saval SG, Haynes R, Roth MM, Löhmannsröben HG et al. A complex multi-notch astronomical filter to suppress the bright infrared sky. Nature Communications. 2011 Dec 6;2:1-7. 581. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms1584