A critical review of rural medical workforce retention in Australia

J. Humphreys, J. Jones, M. Jones, G. Hugo, E. Bamford, D. Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The problem of how best to recruit and retain doctors in rural and remote communities has led governments to adopt a range of medical workforce incentives, including retention grants. A comprehensive literature survey suggests that medical workforce retention has been poorly distinguished from other supply issues such as recruitment, and that its determinants and the process leading to retention are poorly understood. Such a knowledge gap is likely to limit the effectiveness of retention incentives. This article reports the results of this literature review, and advances a conceptual framework as the basis for ongoing research and evaluating how best to deliver effective retention interventions.

LanguageEnglish
Pages91-102
Number of pages12
JournalAustralian health review : a publication of the Australian Hospital Association
Volume24
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Motivation
Organized Financing
Rural Population
Research
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

Humphreys, J. ; Jones, J. ; Jones, M. ; Hugo, G. ; Bamford, E. ; Taylor, D. / A critical review of rural medical workforce retention in Australia. In: Australian health review : a publication of the Australian Hospital Association. 2001 ; Vol. 24, No. 4. pp. 91-102.
@article{27db429e9e5a4eac8edcf3ca01b0944b,
title = "A critical review of rural medical workforce retention in Australia",
abstract = "The problem of how best to recruit and retain doctors in rural and remote communities has led governments to adopt a range of medical workforce incentives, including retention grants. A comprehensive literature survey suggests that medical workforce retention has been poorly distinguished from other supply issues such as recruitment, and that its determinants and the process leading to retention are poorly understood. Such a knowledge gap is likely to limit the effectiveness of retention incentives. This article reports the results of this literature review, and advances a conceptual framework as the basis for ongoing research and evaluating how best to deliver effective retention interventions.",
author = "J. Humphreys and J. Jones and M. Jones and G. Hugo and E. Bamford and D. Taylor",
year = "2001",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "91--102",
journal = "Australian Health Review",
issn = "0156-5788",
publisher = "Australasian Medical Publishing Company",
number = "4",

}

A critical review of rural medical workforce retention in Australia. / Humphreys, J.; Jones, J.; Jones, M.; Hugo, G.; Bamford, E.; Taylor, D.

In: Australian health review : a publication of the Australian Hospital Association, Vol. 24, No. 4, 2001, p. 91-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - A critical review of rural medical workforce retention in Australia

AU - Humphreys, J.

AU - Jones, J.

AU - Jones, M.

AU - Hugo, G.

AU - Bamford, E.

AU - Taylor, D.

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - The problem of how best to recruit and retain doctors in rural and remote communities has led governments to adopt a range of medical workforce incentives, including retention grants. A comprehensive literature survey suggests that medical workforce retention has been poorly distinguished from other supply issues such as recruitment, and that its determinants and the process leading to retention are poorly understood. Such a knowledge gap is likely to limit the effectiveness of retention incentives. This article reports the results of this literature review, and advances a conceptual framework as the basis for ongoing research and evaluating how best to deliver effective retention interventions.

AB - The problem of how best to recruit and retain doctors in rural and remote communities has led governments to adopt a range of medical workforce incentives, including retention grants. A comprehensive literature survey suggests that medical workforce retention has been poorly distinguished from other supply issues such as recruitment, and that its determinants and the process leading to retention are poorly understood. Such a knowledge gap is likely to limit the effectiveness of retention incentives. This article reports the results of this literature review, and advances a conceptual framework as the basis for ongoing research and evaluating how best to deliver effective retention interventions.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035749637&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Review article

VL - 24

SP - 91

EP - 102

JO - Australian Health Review

T2 - Australian Health Review

JF - Australian Health Review

SN - 0156-5788

IS - 4

ER -