A discipline at the crossroads? Using a gender-inspired paradigm to reposition the sociology of work and employment

Kate Huppatz*, Anne Ross-Smith

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The future of work and employment sociology has been a subject of concern for a number of authors in recent years. Halford and Strangleman, among others, have suggested that work and employment sociology is on the decline, in that it has been disconnected from wider sociology and co-opted by management and business schools. In this article we unpack the debate and look at how it relates to gender and work scholarship. In doing so, we propose that the decline thesis might be overstated. While gender and work sociology has been implicated in the demise of labour process theory, it has also embraced change and strengthened and diversified work and employment sociology. Nevertheless, in this article, we treat the perceived threat as an opportunity to rethink work and employment sociology. We propose a four-themed, interdisciplinary, gender-inspired research paradigm.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)756-770
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Sociology
Volume53
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2017

Keywords

  • employment
  • gender
  • labour
  • management and business
  • sociology
  • work

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