A Heideggerian Perspective on the Relationship Between Mintzberg's Distinction Between Engaged and Disconnected Management: The Role of Uncertainty in Management

Steven Segal*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the context of uncertainty and anxiety regarding the role of leadership and management, this article explores the relationship between Mintzberg's concept of the distinction between the engaged and disconnected manager, Heidegger's notion authentic and inauthentic being and Benner and Wrubel's distinction between two forms of professional practice attunement: an attunement to technique and an attunement to lived experience. It argues that while Mintzberg outlines the distinction between engaged and disengaged management, he does not develop an understanding of the conditions which lead a manager to be either engaged or disconnected. The role of anxiety in Heidegger's distinction between authentic and inauthentic being and the role of stress and worry in Benner and Wrubel's distinction between an attunement to technique and an attunement to the lived experience of professional practice provides the basis for understanding the relationship between engaged and disconnected management. After developing the theoretical perspectives of Mintzberg, Heidegger, Benner and Wrubel, two examples are presented: one of the way in which an engaged manager experiences anxiety as an opportunity for greater attunement to lived experience and one who experiences anxiety as a condition for disconnection and detachment from the lived experience of his leadership practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)469-483
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Business Ethics
Volume103
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2011

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