A high-stringency blueprint of the human proteome

Subash Adhikari, Edouard C. Nice, Eric W. Deutsch, Lydie Lane, Gilbert S. Omenn, Stephen R. Pennington, Young-Ki Paik, Christopher M. Overall, Fernando J. Corrales, Ileana M. Cristea, Jennifer E. Van Eyk, Mathias Uhlen, Cecilia Lindskog, Daniel W. Chan, Amos Bairoch, James C. Waddington, Joshua L. Justice, Joshua LaBaer, Henry Rodriguez, Fuchu HeMarkus Kostrzewa, Peipei Ping, Rebekah L. Gundry, Peter Stewart, Sanjeeva Srivastava, Sudhir Srivastava, Fabio C. S. Nogueira, Gilberto B. Domont, Yves Vandenbrouck, Maggie P. Y. Lam, Sara Wennersten, Juan Antonio Vizcaino, Marc Wilkins, Jochen M. Schwenk, Emma Lundberg, Nuno Bandeira, Gyorgy Marko-Varga, Susan T. Weintraub, Charles Pineau, Ulrike Kusebauch, Robert L. Moritz, Seong Beom Ahn, Magnus Palmblad, Michael P. Snyder, Ruedi Aebersold, Mark S. Baker*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    134 Citations (Scopus)
    90 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    The Human Proteome Organization (HUPO) launched the Human Proteome Project (HPP) in 2010, creating an international framework for global collaboration, data sharing, quality assurance and enhancing accurate annotation of the genome-encoded proteome. During the subsequent decade, the HPP established collaborations, developed guidelines and metrics, and undertook reanalysis of previously deposited community data, continuously increasing the coverage of the human proteome. On the occasion of the HPP's tenth anniversary, we here report a 90.4% complete high-stringency human proteome blueprint. This knowledge is essential for discerning molecular processes in health and disease, as we demonstrate by highlighting potential roles the human proteome plays in our understanding, diagnosis and treatment of cancers, cardiovascular and infectious diseases. The Human Proteome Project (HPP) was launched in 2010 to enhance accurate annotation of the genome-encoded proteome. Ten years later, the HPP releases its first blueprint of the human proteome, annotating 90% of all known proteins at high-stringency and discussing the implications of proteomics for precision medicine.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number5301
    Pages (from-to)1-16
    Number of pages16
    JournalNature Communications
    Volume11
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 16 Oct 2020

    Bibliographical note

    Copyright the Author(s) 2020. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

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