A "multicultural model" of the spatial assimilation of ethnic minority groups in Australia's major immigrant-receiving cities

James Forrest*, Michael Poulsen, Ron Johnston

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A multicultural model of the intergenerational absorption of ethnic immigrant groups is proposed. A recently developed methodology to facilitate comparative assessment of the absolute spatial context of ethnic group concentrations is used to analyze segregation dynamics in Australia's three main contemporary immigrant-receiving cities. Ethnic enclaves emerge as transitory phenomena in the Australian urban context. In the absence of significant social discrimination, ethnic group segregation is seen to relate to economic factors. A segmented assimilation approach brings out relevant features of Australia's immigration history as: recency of arrival; the significance of the post-1945 long economic boom compared with the subsequent period of economic restructuring since the early 1970s; the ending of the White Australia policy in the early 1970s; and a distinction between skilled and refugee entry. Intergenerational evidence supports a view of Australian multiculturalism as "assimilation in slow motion."

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)441-463
Number of pages23
JournalUrban Geography
Volume27
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2006

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A "multicultural model" of the spatial assimilation of ethnic minority groups in Australia's major immigrant-receiving cities'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this