A nonmusician with severe Alzheimer’s dementia learns a new song

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The hallmark symptom of Alzheimer’s Dementia (AD) is impaired memory, but memory for familiar music can be preserved. We explored whether a non-musician with severe AD could learn a new song. A 91 year old woman (NC) with severe AD was taught an unfamiliar song. We assessed her delayed song recall (24 hours and 2 weeks), music cognition, two word recall (presented within a familiar song lyric, a famous proverb, or as a word stem completion task), and lyrics and proverb completion. NC’s music cognition (pitch and rhythm perception, recognition of familiar music, completion of lyrics) was relatively preserved. She recalled 0/2 words presented in song lyrics or proverbs, but 2/2 word stems, suggesting intact implicit memory function. She could sing along to the newly learnt song on immediate and delayed recall (24 hours and 2 weeks later), and with intermittent prompting could sing it alone. This is the first detailed study of preserved ability to learn a new song in a non-musician with severe AD, and contributes to observations of relatively preserved musical abilities in people with dementia.

LanguageEnglish
Pages36-40
Number of pages5
JournalNeurocase
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2017

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Music
Alzheimer Disease
Aphorisms and Proverbs
Aptitude
Cognition
Song
Alzheimer
Dementia
Pitch Perception
Short-Term Memory
Proverbs
Completion
Song Lyrics
Lyrics
Music Cognition

Keywords

  • Alzheimer’s Dementia
  • memory
  • Music
  • singing

Cite this

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A nonmusician with severe Alzheimer’s dementia learns a new song. / Baird, Amee; Umbach, Heidi; Thompson, William Forde.

In: Neurocase, Vol. 23, No. 1, 02.2017, p. 36-40.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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