A paternity advantage for speedy males? Sperm precedence patterns and female re-mating frequencies in a sexually cannibalistic praying mantid

Katherine L. Barry, Gregory I. Holwell, Marie E. Herberstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Scramble competition polygyny is expected when females and/or resources are widely dispersed and not easily monopolized by males, or when there is an abundance of mates during an extremely restricted reproductive period. Additional factors such as first male sperm precedence or low female re-mating rate might further explain the propensity of males to engage in scramble competition. The sexually cannibalistic praying mantid Pseudomantis albofimbriata exhibits a polygynous mating system, where females exist in low-density populations and male competition manifests as the race to find females rather than as direct physical fighting. Here, we aim to determine whether there is a paternity advantage for the first-male to mate and/or a low frequency of female re-mating. First, we determined sperm precedence patterns in P. albofimbriata using the sterile male technique. Second, we tested the likelihood of female re-mating in P. albofimbriata by comparing the close-range approach behaviour and frequency of successful mating attempts for males when paired with virgin as opposed to recently mated females, and by comparing the frequency of long-distance male attraction between virgin and mated females. We found no paternity advantage for the first male to mate, rather a second male advantage. Although mated females were not rejected by males when approached from close-range, they were chemically unattractive to males searching from a distance. Since initial mate attraction in many praying mantids, including P. albofimbriata, is mediated via long-distance chemical communication, we believe the latter result is more ecologically relevant and therefore more important. These results suggest that the relatively low frequency of female re-mating observed in P. albofimbriata may be an additional factor driving scramble competition in this system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)107-119
Number of pages13
JournalEvolutionary Ecology
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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