A pilot study of phase-evoked acoustic responses from the ears of human subjects

Anders T. Christensen, James Dewey, Sumitrajit Dhar, Rodrigo Ordoñez, Dorte Hammershøi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

Abstract

Otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) evoked by pure tones lock onto the phase of the stimulus at the place of their generation in the cochlea. The effects of phase transitions in a pure tone stimulus on OAEs have not been investigated. By combining responses to pure tones with smooth phase transitions, phase-evoked residual responses (PERRs) were extracted from nine normal-hearing subjects. Five of them had PERRs in at least 18 of 36 parameter conditions expected to yield a response. PERRs do not have a straightforward dependence on stimulus parameters, but their general prevalence suggests a temporary decoupling between stimulus and OAE phase-between 5 and 10 ms. Since the stimulus is narrow in the frequency domain, the PERR may reflect the dynamic behavior of localized regions of OAE generators.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMechanics of hearing
Subtitle of host publicationprotein to perception : Proceedings of the 12th International Workshop on the Mechanics of Hearing
EditorsK. Domenica Karavitaki, David P. Corey
Place of PublicationMelville, NY
PublisherAmerican Institute of Physics
Pages090017-1-090017-5
Number of pages5
Volume1703
ISBN (Electronic)9780735413504
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Dec 2015
Externally publishedYes
Event12th International Workshop on the Mechanics of Hearing: Protein to Perception - Cape Sounio, Greece
Duration: 23 Jun 201429 Jun 2014

Publication series

NameAIP Conference Proceedings
PublisherAMER INST PHYSICS
Volume1703
ISSN (Print)0094-243X

Other

Other12th International Workshop on the Mechanics of Hearing: Protein to Perception
CountryGreece
CityCape Sounio
Period23/06/1429/06/14

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