'A Pre-eminent Right to Political Rule': 1 Indigenous Fijian Power and Multi-ethnic Nation Building

Robert Norton*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The indigenous Fijian conviction of entitlement to political power was encouraged by their privileged position in the colonial state and their marginalisation in the modern economy. The development of a cohesive nation state has been impeded by ongoing conflict between two political imperatives: indigenous nationalism and the need to shape a system of political representation and government accommodating the interests of the non-indigenous citizens, primarily the Indians, who together number over 40% of the population. This paper traces the course of that conflict from the commencement of decolonisation in the early 1960s to the political instability arising from strengthened ethno-nationalism and military intervention since 1987.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)521-535
Number of pages15
JournalRound Table
Volume101
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2012

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