A preliminary examination of treatment barriers, preferences, and histories of women with symptoms of social anxiety disorder

Julie. A. Black, Josephine Paparo, Bethany M. M. Wootton*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is a common mental health condition that is characterised by a persistent fear of social or performance situations. Despite effective treatments being available, many individuals with SAD do not seek treatment or delay treatment seeking for many years. The aim of the present study was to examine treatment barriers, treatment histories, and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) delivery preferences in a sample of women with clinically relevant SAD symptoms. Ninety-nine women (M-age = 34.90, SD = 11.28) completed the online questionnaires and were included in the study. Participants were recruited from advertisements on community noticeboards and posts on social media. The results demonstrated that less than 5% of those who received psychological treatment in the past were likely to have received best-practice CBT. The most commonly cited barriers to accessing treatment for women with SAD related to direct costs (63%) and indirect costs (e.g., transport/childcare) (28%). The most preferred treatment delivery method overall was individual face-to-face treatment (70%). The study demonstrates a need to provide a variety of treatment options in order to enhance access to empirically supported treatment for women with SAD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)267-277
Number of pages11
JournalBehaviour Change
Volume40
Issue number4
Early online date17 Jan 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2023

Keywords

  • social phobia
  • social anxiety disorder
  • treatment barriers
  • help-seeking

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