A preliminary investigation into the existence of a hypervigilance subtype of auditory hallucination in people with psychosis

Lucy Garwood, Guy Dodgson, Vicki Bruce, Simon McCarthy-Jones*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The phenomenological heterogeneity of auditory hallucinations (AHs) means individual models struggle to account for all aspects of the experience. One alternative is that distinct subtypes of AHs exist, with each requiring their own unique explanatory model and tailored cognitive behavioural intervention strategies. Aims: This exploratory study tested for the presence of one specific potential AH-subtype, hypervigilance hallucinations (HV-AHs). Method: Four specific aspects of the phenomenology of AHs (chosen on the basis of the predicted phenomenology of HV-AHs) were assessed using a semi-structured interview in 32 individual AHs taken from reports from 15 patients with psychosis. Results: Cluster analysis (at the level of the individual AH-experience) offered support for the existence of a distinct HV-AH subtype, characterized by hearing threatening, externally-located voices when attention was externally-focused. Other clusters identified all shared the contrasting properties of occurring in quiet contexts when patients' attention was internally focused. Conclusions: The results offered tentative support for the existence of an HV-AH subcategorization and justifies future research in larger samples. Potential implications for models of AHs are also considered.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)52-62
Number of pages11
JournalBehavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy
Volume43
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Jan 2015

Keywords

  • Auditory verbal hallucination
  • categorization
  • hearing voices.
  • psychosis

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