A prospective study of the incidence of juvenile-onset recurrent respiratory papillomatosis after implementation of a national HPV vaccination program

Daniel Novakovic, Alan T. L. Cheng, Yvonne Zurynski, Robert Booy, Paul J. Walker, Robert Berkowitz, Henley Harrison, Robert Black, Christopher Perry, Shyan Vijayasekaran, David Wabnitz, Hannah Burns, Sepehr N. Tabrizi, Suzanne M. Garland, Elizabeth Elliott, Julia M.L. Brotherton*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis is a rare but morbid disease caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6 and 11. Infection is preventable through HPV vaccination. Following an extensive quadrivalent HPV vaccination program (females 12-26 years in 2007-2009) in Australia, we established a method to monitor incidence and demographics of juvenile-onset recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (JORRP) cases. Methods. The Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit undertakes surveillance of rare pediatric diseases by contacting practitioners monthly. We enrolled pediatric otorhinolaryngologists and offered HPV typing. We report findings for 5 years to end 2016. Results. The average annual incidence rate was 0.07 per 100 000. The largest number of cases was reported in the first year, with decreasing annual frequency thereafter. Rates declined from 0.16 per 100 000 in 2012 to 0.02 per 100 000 in 2016 (P = .034). Among the 15 incident cases (60% male), no mothers were vaccinated prepregnancy, 20% had maternal history of genital warts, and 60% were first born; 13/15 were born vaginally. Genotyped cases were HPV-6 (n = 4) or HPV-11 (n = 3). Conclusion. To our knowledge, this is the first report internationally documenting decline in JORRP incidence in children following a quadrivalent HPV vaccination program.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)208-212
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume217
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jan 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • human papillomavirus
  • pediatric otolaryngology
  • recurrent respiratory papillomatosis
  • surveillance
  • vaccination

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