A qualitative comparison of needles and insulin pump use in children with type 1 diabetes

Madeleine Ferrari*, Doris J. F. McIlwain, Geoffrey Ambler

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Managing type 1 diabetes mellitus is an ongoing and challenging process; we investigated children’s experience of different treatment regimens. Interviews with 17 children (7–15 years) at two time points were analysed using the grounded theory approach. Illness phase and treatment regimen shaped how bodily cues were interpreted. Insulin pump therapy allowed children to listen to and trust their bodily cues rather than override. Shame was a barrier to support engagement. Different internalised and externalised views of type 1 diabetes mellitus emerged. Overall, children were insightful experts of their own experiences. Recommendations for psychological interventions would benefit from empirical testing.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1332-1342
    Number of pages11
    JournalJournal of Health Psychology
    Volume23
    Issue number10
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 2018

    Keywords

    • children
    • diabetes
    • grounded theory
    • health psychology
    • treatment

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