A quantitative analysis of spectral mechanisms involved in auditory detection of coloration by a single wall reflection

Jörg M. Buchholz*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Coloration detection thresholds (CDTs) were measured for a single reflection as a function of spectral content and reflection delay for diotic stimulus presentation. The direct sound was a 320-ms long burst of bandpass-filtered noise with varying lower and upper cut-off frequencies. The resulting threshold data revealed that: (1) sensitivity decreases with decreasing bandwidth and increasing reflection delay and (2) high-frequency components contribute less to detection than low-frequency components. The auditory processes that may be involved in coloration detection (CD) are discussed in terms of a spectrum-based auditory model, which is conceptually similar to the pattern-transformation model of pitch (Wightman, 1973). Hence, the model derives an auto-correlation function of the input stimulus by applying a frequency analysis to an auditory representation of the power spectrum. It was found that, to successfully describe the quantitative behavior of the CDT data, three important mechanisms need to be included: (1) auditory bandpass filters with a narrower bandwidth than classic Gammatone filters, the increase in spectral resolution was here linked to cochlear suppression, (2) a spectral contrast enhancement process that reflects neural inhibition mechanisms, and (3) integration of information across auditory frequency bands.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)192-203
Number of pages12
JournalHearing Research
Volume277
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A quantitative analysis of spectral mechanisms involved in auditory detection of coloration by a single wall reflection'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this