A recurrent loss-of-function alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AARS) mutation in patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Type 2N (CMT2N)

Heather M. McLaughlin, Reiko Sakaguchi, William Giblin, Thomas E. Wilson, Leslie Biesecker, James R. Lupski, Kevin Talbot, Jeffery M. Vance, Stephan Züchner, Yi Chung Lee, Marina Kennerson, Ya Ming Hou, Garth Nicholson, Anthony Antonellis*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease comprises a heterogeneous group of peripheral neuropathies characterized by muscle weakness and wasting, and impaired sensation in the extremities. Four genes encoding an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (ARS) have been implicated in CMT disease. ARSs are ubiquitously expressed, essential enzymes that ligate amino acids to cognate tRNA molecules. Recently, a p.Arg329His variant in the alanyltRNA synthetase (AARS) gene was found to segregate with dominant axonal CMT type 2N (CMT2N) in two French families; however, the functional consequence of this mutation has not been determined. To investigate the role of AARS in CMT, we performed a mutation screen of the AARS gene in patients with peripheral neuropathy. Our results showed that p.Arg329His AARS also segregated with CMT disease in a large Australian family. Aminoacylation and yeast viability assays showed that p.Arg329His AARS severely reduces enzyme activity. Genotyping analysis indicated that this mutation arose on three distinct haplotypes, and the results of bisulfite sequencing suggested that methylation-mediated deamination of a CpG dinucleotide gives rise to the recurrent p.Arg329His AARS mutation. Together, our data suggest that impaired tRNA charging plays a role in the molecular pathology of CMT2N, and that patients with CMT should be directly tested for the p.Arg329His AARS mutation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)244-253
Number of pages10
JournalHuman mutation
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2012
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

An Erratum exists for this article and can be found in Human Mutation (2014) 35(4) on p. 512 at https://doi.org/10.1002/humu.21635

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