A self-directed psychosocial intervention with minimal therapist contact for adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

Caroline S. Stevenson*, Richard J. Stevenson, Stephanie Whitmont

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    59 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Using a randomized controlled design, the efficacy of a self-directed psychosocial intervention with minimal therapist contact, aimed at reducing the symptoms of adult ADHD, was examined. Following the intervention, the treatment group reported significantly reduced ADHD symptomatology; improved organizational skills; improved self esteem and better anger control, when compared to waiting list controls. Comorbid anxiety, depression, high levels of stress and learning problems, did not effect treatment outcome. Improvements in ADHD symptomatology and organizational skills were maintained at a 2-month follow-up. Although the programme was successful, close adherence to the programme was necessary for optimum treatment gains. These findings build upon an earlier study that used a more intensive form of programme delivery and support the view that psychosocial interventions can enhance daily functioning for adult ADHD.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)93-101
    Number of pages9
    JournalClinical Psychology and Psychotherapy
    Volume10
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 2003

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