A Sound education

the gramophone and the classroom in the United Kingdom and the United States, 1920-1940

Colin Symes

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The advent of the gramophone transformed the cultural conditions of contemporary music, including the way it was taught. For a considerable period of time, musicians and music educators disparaged the gramophone. The members of the musical appreciation movement were more sympathetic and helped transform the gramophone's educational image during the 1920s and 1930s. They argued that the gramophone, contrary to its detractors, might stem the appeal of popular music. As is clear from the sentiments of those espousing the pedagogic uses of the gramophone – which are analysed in this paper – their advocacy went far beyond music and was part of a broader cultural agenda, which included arresting the moral dangers associated with popular music.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)163-178
    Number of pages16
    JournalBritish Journal of Music Education
    Volume21
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2004

    Bibliographical note

    Copyright 2004 Cambridge University Press. Reprinted from British journal of music education.

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