A suppression subtractive hybridization approach reveals niche-specific genes that may be involved in predator avoidance in marine Synechococcus isolates

H. Jones, M. Ostrowski, D. J. Scanlan*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Picocyanobacteria of the genus Synechococcus are important contributors to marine primary production and are ubiquitous in the world's oceans. This genus is genetically diverse, and at least 10 discrete lineages or clades have been identified phylogenetically. However, little if anything is known about the genetic attributes which characterize particular lineages or are unique to specific strains. Here, we used a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) approach to identify strain- and clade-specific genes in two well-characterized laboratory strains, Synechococcus sp. strain WH8103 (clade III) and Synechococcus sp. strain WH7803 (clade V). Among the genes that were identified as potentially unique to each strain were genes encoding proteins that may be involved in specific predator avoidance, including a glycosyltransferase in strain WH8103 and a permease component of an ABC-type polysaccharide/polyol phosphate export system in WH7803. During this work the genome of one of these strains, WH7803, became available. This allowed assessment of the number of false-positive sequences (i.e., sequences present in the tester genome) present among the SSH-enriched sequences. We found that approximately 9% of the WH8103 sequences were potential false-positive sequences, which demonstrated that caution should be used when this technology is used to assess genomic differences in genetically similar bacterial strains.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2730-2737
Number of pages8
JournalApplied and Environmental Microbiology
Volume72
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2006
Externally publishedYes

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