A theory of change framework for developing cross-faculty programs: An information systems perspective

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Abstract

Information systems (IS) is a discipline that draws upon many other disciplines to bridge theory and practice and address the information and knowledge needs of individuals, organisations and society. We propose that an ideal education in IS would be delivered via cross-faculty programs of study that are not combinations of units from different faculties and disciplines, but programs which include a coherent and cohesive set of units co-designed and co-delivered by teaching staff from more than one faculty. This allows students, and teachers, to appreciate the different content and perspectives within the same context, as they will experience in the workplace, and allow them to develop deeper understandings of the complexity that can arise in their roles as mediators and communicators in finding appropriate IT solutions. Such a model poses a radical change, and thus the framework we offer uses a 'theory of change' agenda. Richards & Marrone

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationACIS 2012: Location, Location, Location
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of the 23rd Australasian Conference on Information Systems
EditorsJohn Lamp
Place of PublicationMelbourne
PublisherDeakin University
Pages1-11
Number of pages11
ISBN (Print)9781741561722
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Event23rd Australasian Conference on Information Systems, ACIS 2012 - Geelong, VIC, Australia
Duration: 3 Dec 20125 Dec 2012

Other

Other23rd Australasian Conference on Information Systems, ACIS 2012
CountryAustralia
CityGeelong, VIC
Period3/12/125/12/12

Bibliographical note

Copyright Richards and Marrone 2012. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

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