A unique burial of a father and a son

Niankhpepy the Black and Pepyankh the Black, at Meir

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The re-clearance of Section A of the cemetery of Meir proved that Niankhpepy the Black excavated for himself probably the largest known rock-cut tomb of the Old Kingdom (Tomb A4) but died before starting its decoration. His son, Pepyankh the Black, excavated two joint tombs, A1 and A2, for his father and himself and connected his father's chapel (A1) to his burial chamber beneath the floor of A4 via a sloping passage. This was presumably shortly before Djau of Deir el-Gebrawi buried his father with him in the same tomb.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication'The perfection that endures...'
Subtitle of host publicationstudies on Old Kingdom art and archaeology
EditorsKamil O. Kuraszkiewicz, Edyta Kopp, Dániel Takács
Place of PublicationWarsaw
PublisherUniversity of Warsaw
Pages225-230, pls 31-36
Number of pages6
ISBN (Print)9789394761202
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Keywords

  • Archaeology
  • Egyptology
  • social history
  • Administration
  • Old Kingdom

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A unique burial of a father and a son: Niankhpepy the Black and Pepyankh the Black, at Meir'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Kanawati, N. (2018). A unique burial of a father and a son: Niankhpepy the Black and Pepyankh the Black, at Meir. In K. O. Kuraszkiewicz, E. Kopp, & D. Takács (Eds.), 'The perfection that endures...': studies on Old Kingdom art and archaeology (pp. 225-230, pls 31-36). Warsaw: University of Warsaw.