A view on Greater Angkor: a multi-scalar approach for investigating the Khmer forests

Arianna Traviglia

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

Abstract

This paper will focus on the results of a joint international project (a partnership between the University of Sydney and the University of Venice) that develops and applies satellite remote sensing methodologies for finding and mapping unknown archaeological sites in the surroundings of Angkor, in Cambodia. Long famous for its temples, this World Heritage site is now increasingly recognized as a vast, low-density urban landscape. The project consists of using the spectral content of remotely sensed images to reveal the presence of buried sites and structures of the ancient Khmer landscape on the basis of the different spectral characteristics of the terrain and vegetation. By applying spectral analysis, the current research aims to scan vegetated and bare soil areas in order to clarify features that are ambiguous in existing maps and reveal features which would otherwise remain undetected.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 1st International EARSeL Workshop, CNR, Rome, September 30-October 4, 2008, Advances in Remote Sensing for Archaeology and Cultural Heritage Management
EditorsR. Lasaponara, N. Masini
Place of PublicationRome
PublisherAracne
Pages23-26
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)9788854820302
Publication statusPublished - 2008
EventInternational EARSeL Workshop 'Advances in Remote Sensing for Archaeology and Culturale Heritage Management' - Rome
Duration: 30 Sep 20084 Oct 2008

Workshop

WorkshopInternational EARSeL Workshop 'Advances in Remote Sensing for Archaeology and Culturale Heritage Management'
CityRome
Period30/09/084/10/08

Keywords

  • Angkor (Cambodia)
  • multispectral analysis
  • Vegetation Indices
  • PCA
  • ASTER
  • Quickbird
  • Ikonos

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