Acceptability, tolerability, and potential efficacy of cognitive behavioural therapy for Insomnia Disorder subtypes defined by polysomnography: a retrospective cohort study

Christopher B. Miller*, Colin A. Espie, Delwyn J. Bartlett, Nathaniel S. Marshall, Christopher J. Gordon, Ronald R. Grunstein

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Citations (Scopus)
26 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

In this retrospective cohort study, we describe acceptability, tolerability and potential efficacy of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) in Insomnia Disorder subtypes, derived from polysomnography (PSG): insomnia with normal-sleep duration (I-NSD) and insomnia with short-sleep duration (I-SSD). All research volunteers were offered access to digital CBT, single component sleep restriction therapy and face-to-face group CBT. Follow-up occurred at three months post-treatment using the insomnia severity index (ISI). 96 participants (61 females, mean age of 41 years) were grouped into either normal-sleep (n = 53) or short-sleep (n = 43). CBT was acceptable to 63% of participants (normal-sleep = 31, short-sleep = 29), with 28 completing therapy (tolerability: normal-sleep = 11, short-sleep = 17). For potential efficacy, 39 (normal-sleep = 20, short-sleep = 19) out of 96 participants (41%) completed a follow-up ISI assessment. In this reduced sample, mean (SD) ISI scores decreased across both groups (normal-sleep: 18.0 (4.0) to 10.7 (4.6); short-sleep: 16.5 (5.5) to 11.0 (6.3); both P < 0.01). Those with normal-sleep were more likely to respond (≥6-point ISI reduction) to CBT compared to short-sleep (70%, n = 14/20 vs. 37%, n = 7/19 respectively, P = 0.038). In this cohort, 60 (63%) of participants attempted CBT and of those 28 (47%) completed therapy. Results may be comparable to clinical participants with implications for the successful translation of CBT for insomnia.

Original languageEnglish
Article number6664
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalScientific Reports
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2018
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2018. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

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