Accessibility in WIL: employer views on how work integrated learning (WIL) stakeholders can address the challenge of access and equity in WIL

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingOther chapter contributionResearch

    Abstract

    Work integrated learning (WIL) offers students many learning, career and personal benefits however, a contentious problem is emerging; namely that of student accessibility in WIL (Mackaway, Winchester-Seeto & Carter, 2014). This Showcase presentation offers findings from an Australian study into the challenge of access and equity in WIL. In-depth interviews were conducted with 14 partner organisations from a range of industries including law, banking and professional services, along with three community service not-for-profit organisations. Part of the research focused on understanding current practices employers use to address issues of accessibility in WIL as well as areas for further action. Thematic analysis revealed common measures taken involve the reduction of barriers associated with the selection process, and while the majority of participants identified ways their own organisation could improve, they also offered ideas regarding steps for professional associations, universities and students. Interestingly, recommendations largely related to capacity-building for all WIL stakeholders – a theme echoed elsewhere in current WIL research (Blackmore et al., 2014; Peach, Moore & Campbell, 2016). Findings suggest there may be shared concerns between university and partner organisations regarding issues of access and equity which could be used to strengthen connections and address the problem of student accessibility in WIL.
    LanguageEnglish
    Title of host publicationWIL 2020
    Subtitle of host publicationpushing the boundaries : ACEN 2016 Conference Proceedings
    Place of PublicationSpringvale South, VIC
    PublisherAustralian Collaborative Education Network
    Pages115-115
    Number of pages1
    ISBN (Print)9780980570632
    Publication statusPublished - 2016
    EventAustralian Collaborative Education Network National Conference - Sydney
    Duration: 28 Sep 201630 Sep 2016

    Conference

    ConferenceAustralian Collaborative Education Network National Conference
    CitySydney
    Period28/09/1630/09/16

    Fingerprint

    employer
    equity
    stakeholder
    learning
    student
    university
    community service
    professional association
    banking
    profit
    career
    Law
    industry
    interview

    Keywords

    • accessibility
    • placements
    • partner perspectives
    • capacity building

    Cite this

    Mackaway, J. (2016). Accessibility in WIL: employer views on how work integrated learning (WIL) stakeholders can address the challenge of access and equity in WIL. In WIL 2020: pushing the boundaries : ACEN 2016 Conference Proceedings (pp. 115-115). Springvale South, VIC: Australian Collaborative Education Network.
    Mackaway, Jacqueline. / Accessibility in WIL : employer views on how work integrated learning (WIL) stakeholders can address the challenge of access and equity in WIL. WIL 2020: pushing the boundaries : ACEN 2016 Conference Proceedings. Springvale South, VIC : Australian Collaborative Education Network, 2016. pp. 115-115
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    abstract = "Work integrated learning (WIL) offers students many learning, career and personal benefits however, a contentious problem is emerging; namely that of student accessibility in WIL (Mackaway, Winchester-Seeto & Carter, 2014). This Showcase presentation offers findings from an Australian study into the challenge of access and equity in WIL. In-depth interviews were conducted with 14 partner organisations from a range of industries including law, banking and professional services, along with three community service not-for-profit organisations. Part of the research focused on understanding current practices employers use to address issues of accessibility in WIL as well as areas for further action. Thematic analysis revealed common measures taken involve the reduction of barriers associated with the selection process, and while the majority of participants identified ways their own organisation could improve, they also offered ideas regarding steps for professional associations, universities and students. Interestingly, recommendations largely related to capacity-building for all WIL stakeholders – a theme echoed elsewhere in current WIL research (Blackmore et al., 2014; Peach, Moore & Campbell, 2016). Findings suggest there may be shared concerns between university and partner organisations regarding issues of access and equity which could be used to strengthen connections and address the problem of student accessibility in WIL.",
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    Mackaway, J 2016, Accessibility in WIL: employer views on how work integrated learning (WIL) stakeholders can address the challenge of access and equity in WIL. in WIL 2020: pushing the boundaries : ACEN 2016 Conference Proceedings. Australian Collaborative Education Network, Springvale South, VIC, pp. 115-115, Australian Collaborative Education Network National Conference, Sydney, 28/09/16.

    Accessibility in WIL : employer views on how work integrated learning (WIL) stakeholders can address the challenge of access and equity in WIL. / Mackaway, Jacqueline.

    WIL 2020: pushing the boundaries : ACEN 2016 Conference Proceedings. Springvale South, VIC : Australian Collaborative Education Network, 2016. p. 115-115.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingOther chapter contributionResearch

    TY - CHAP

    T1 - Accessibility in WIL

    T2 - employer views on how work integrated learning (WIL) stakeholders can address the challenge of access and equity in WIL

    AU - Mackaway,Jacqueline

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    N2 - Work integrated learning (WIL) offers students many learning, career and personal benefits however, a contentious problem is emerging; namely that of student accessibility in WIL (Mackaway, Winchester-Seeto & Carter, 2014). This Showcase presentation offers findings from an Australian study into the challenge of access and equity in WIL. In-depth interviews were conducted with 14 partner organisations from a range of industries including law, banking and professional services, along with three community service not-for-profit organisations. Part of the research focused on understanding current practices employers use to address issues of accessibility in WIL as well as areas for further action. Thematic analysis revealed common measures taken involve the reduction of barriers associated with the selection process, and while the majority of participants identified ways their own organisation could improve, they also offered ideas regarding steps for professional associations, universities and students. Interestingly, recommendations largely related to capacity-building for all WIL stakeholders – a theme echoed elsewhere in current WIL research (Blackmore et al., 2014; Peach, Moore & Campbell, 2016). Findings suggest there may be shared concerns between university and partner organisations regarding issues of access and equity which could be used to strengthen connections and address the problem of student accessibility in WIL.

    AB - Work integrated learning (WIL) offers students many learning, career and personal benefits however, a contentious problem is emerging; namely that of student accessibility in WIL (Mackaway, Winchester-Seeto & Carter, 2014). This Showcase presentation offers findings from an Australian study into the challenge of access and equity in WIL. In-depth interviews were conducted with 14 partner organisations from a range of industries including law, banking and professional services, along with three community service not-for-profit organisations. Part of the research focused on understanding current practices employers use to address issues of accessibility in WIL as well as areas for further action. Thematic analysis revealed common measures taken involve the reduction of barriers associated with the selection process, and while the majority of participants identified ways their own organisation could improve, they also offered ideas regarding steps for professional associations, universities and students. Interestingly, recommendations largely related to capacity-building for all WIL stakeholders – a theme echoed elsewhere in current WIL research (Blackmore et al., 2014; Peach, Moore & Campbell, 2016). Findings suggest there may be shared concerns between university and partner organisations regarding issues of access and equity which could be used to strengthen connections and address the problem of student accessibility in WIL.

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    Mackaway J. Accessibility in WIL: employer views on how work integrated learning (WIL) stakeholders can address the challenge of access and equity in WIL. In WIL 2020: pushing the boundaries : ACEN 2016 Conference Proceedings. Springvale South, VIC: Australian Collaborative Education Network. 2016. p. 115-115