Acoustic analysis of monophthong and diphthong production in acquired severe to profound hearing loss

Sallyanne Palethorpe, Catherine Watson, Rosalind Barker

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    8 Citations (Scopus)
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    Abstract

    The effect of diminished auditory feedback on monophthong and diphthong production was examined in postlingually deafened Australian-English speaking adults. The participants were 4 female and 3 male speakers with severe to profound hearing loss, who were compared to 11 age- and accent-matched normally hearing speakers. The test materials were 5 repetitions of hVd words containing 18 vowels. Acoustic measures that were studied included F1, F2, discrete cosine transform coefficients (DCTs), and vowel duration information. The durational analyses revealed increased total vowel durations with a maintenance of the tense/lax vowel distinctions in the deafened speakers. The deafened speakers preserved a differentiated vowel space, although there were some gender-specific differences seen. For example, there was a retraction of F2 in the front vowels for the female speakers that did not occur in the males. However, all deafened speakers showed a close correspondence between the monophthong and diphthong formant movements that did occur. Gaussian classification highlighted vowel confusions resulting from changes in the deafened vowel space. The results support the view that postlingually deafened speakers maintain reasonably good speech intelligibility, in part by employing production strategies designed to bolster auditory feedback. (C) 2003 Acoustical Society of America.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1055-1068
    Number of pages14
    JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
    Volume114
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Aug 2003

    Keywords

    • COCHLEAR IMPLANT USERS
    • POSTLINGUALLY DEAFENED ADULTS
    • VOWEL FORMANT FREQUENCIES
    • SHIFTED AUDITORY-FEEDBACK
    • SPEECH PRODUCTION
    • FUNDAMENTAL-FREQUENCY
    • AUSTRALIAN ENGLISH
    • SENSORIMOTOR ADAPTATION
    • SPEAKERS
    • CHILDREN

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