Addressing population aging and Alzheimer's disease through the Australian Imaging Biomarkers and Lifestyle study

Collaboration with the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

Kathryn A. Ellis, Christopher C. Rowe, Victor L. Villemagne, Ralph N. Martins, Colin L. Masters, Olivier Salvado, Cassandra Szoeke, David Ames

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Australian Imaging Biomarkers and Lifestyle (AIBL) study is a longitudinal study of 1112 volunteers from healthy, mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease (AD) populations who can be assessed and followed up for prospective research into aging and AD. AIBL aims to improve understanding of the pathogenesis, early clinical manifestation, and diagnosis of AD, and identify diet and lifestyle factors that influence the development of AD. For AIBL, the magnetic resonance imaging parameters of Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) were adopted and the Pittsuburgh compound B (11C-PiB) positron emission tomography (PET) acquisition and neuropsychological tests were designed to permit comparison and pooling with ADNI data. Differences to ADNI include assessment every 18-months, imaging in 25% (magnetic resonance imaging, 11C-PiB PET but no fluorodeoxyglucose PET), more comprehensive neuropsychological testing, and detailed collection of diet and lifestyle data. AIBL has completed the first 18-month follow-up and is making imaging and clinical data available through the ADNI website. Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data is revealing links between cognition, brain amyloid burden, structural brain changes, biomarkers, and lifestyle.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)291-296
Number of pages6
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Amyloid imaging
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Mild cognitive impairment
  • Positron emission tomography

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