Adoption of information technology in primary care physician offices in New Zealand and Denmark, part 5: Final comparisons

Denis Protti*, Tom Bowden, Ib Johansen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This is the last in a series of five papers about the use of computing technology in general practitioner (GP) practices in Denmark and New Zealand. This paper introduces a unique comparison instrument developed for this study using the best evidence available namely data was pulled from centralised databases and was indisputable (e.g. percentage of primary care physicians who send medication prescriptions electronically to pharmacies). Where the data was simply not available, estimates were made. Since the reliability of the data on the use of computers by primary care physicians is so variable and in some case simply not available, the authors also introduce the use of a Cochrane-like confidence factor (CF) to each comparison measure. The paper draws particular attention to the fact that both countries have a highly visible central unifying body or what might be called a Health System Integrator; though Denmark s Medcom is a pseudo government agency New Zealand's HealthLink is a private company, both play critical roles in the success story of these two countries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-22
Number of pages6
JournalInformatics in Primary Care
Volume17
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - May 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Critical success factors
  • Electronic medical records systems
  • Evaluation and comparison
  • Medical and health informatics

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