Adult literacy and basic education for deaf and hearing-impaired people: Service provider perspectives

Robert Cummins, Greg Leigh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A survey was conducted within the Adult Literacy and Basic Education network in Victoria to determine the extent of provision for, and participation by, students with impaired hearing. Seventy-one service providers were identified through stratified sampling and were interviewed by telephone. It was found that the proportion of such students being enrolled in these programs has decreased since 1986. Moreover, while overall enrolments by this group are relatively low, they are lowest in programs targeting the development of literacy skills. This is in spite of the increased potential for literacy difficulties to be experienced by members of this group. While service providers are generally positive about the enrolment of these students, teacher training and resources are generally inadequate to effectively meet the instructional needs of this special group. The implications of these findings are discussed in terms of future service provision.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)22-30
Number of pages9
JournalAustralian Journal of Adult and Community Education
Volume32
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

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