Advection shapes Southern Ocean microbial assemblages independent of distance and environment effects

David Wilkins, Erik Van Sebille, Stephen R. Rintoul, Federico M. Lauro, Ricardo Cavicchioli*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

77 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although environmental selection and spatial separation have been shown to shape the distribution and abundance of marine microorganisms, the effects of advection (physical transport) have not been directly tested. Here we examine 25 samples covering all major water masses of the Southern Ocean to determine the effects of advection on microbial biogeography. Even when environmental factors and spatial separation are controlled for, there is a positive correlation between advection distance and taxonomic dissimilarity, indicating that an 'advection effect' has a role in shaping marine microbial community composition. This effect is likely due to the advection of cells increasing the probability that upstream microorganisms will colonize downstream sites. Our study shows that in addition to distance and environmental selection, advection shapes the composition of marine microbial communities.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2457
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalNature Communications
Volume4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

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