Advertising food to Australian children: has self-regulation worked?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose : This paper aims to outline the historic development of advertising regulation that governs food advertising to children in Australia. Through reviewing primary and secondary literature, such as government reports and research, this paper examines the influence of various regulatory policies that limit children’s exposure to food and beverage marketing on practices across television (TV), branded websites and Facebook pages.

Design/methodology/approach: This paper reviews studies performed by the food industry and public health researchers and reviews of the evidence by government and non-government agencies from the early 19th century until the present day. Also included are several other research studies that evaluate the effects of self-regulation on Australian TV food advertising.

Findings: The government, public health and the food industry have attempted to respond to the rapid changes within the advertising, marketing and media industries by developing and reviewing advertising codes. However, self-regulation is failing to protect Australian children from exposure to unhealthy food advertising.

Practical implications: The findings could aid the food and beverage industry, and the self-regulatory system, to promote comprehensive and achievable solutions to the growing obesity rates in Australia by introducing new standards that keep pace with expanded forms of marketing communication.

Originality/value: This study adds to the research on the history of regulation of food advertising to children in Australia by offering insights into the government, public health and food industry’s attempts to respond to the rapid changes within the advertising, marketing and media industries by developing and reviewing advertising codes.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)525-550
Number of pages26
JournalJournal of Historical Research in Marketing
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • advertising
  • Australia
  • children
  • food
  • online advertising
  • regulation
  • self-regulation
  • television

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