After-hours or weekend rehabilitation improves outcomes and increases physical activity but does not affect length of stay: a systematic review

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Abstract

Question: In adults undergoing inpatient rehabilitation, does additional after-hours rehabilitation decrease length of stay and improve functional outcome, activities of daily living performance and physical activity? Design: Systematic review with meta-analysis of randomised trials. Participants: Adults participating in an inpatient rehabilitation program. Intervention: Additional rehabilitation provided after hours (evening or weekend). Outcome measures: Function was measured with tests such as the Motor Assessment Scale, 10-m walk test, the Timed Up and Go test, and Berg Balance Scale. Performance on activities of daily living was measured with the Barthel index or the Functional Independence Measure. Length of stay was measured in days. Physical activity levels were measured as number of steps or time spent upright. Standardised mean differences (SMD) or mean differences (MD) were used to combine these outcomes. Adverse events were summarised using relative risks (RR). Study quality was assessed using PEDro scores. Results: Seven trials were included in the review. All trials had strong methodological quality, scoring 8/10 on the PEDro scale. Among the measures of function, only balance showed a significant effect: the MD was 14 points better (95% CI 5 to 23) with additional after-hours rehabilitation on a 0-to-56-point scale. The improvement in activities of daily living performance with additional after-hours rehabilitation was of borderline statistical significance (SMD 0.10, 95% CI 0.00 to 0.21). Hospital length of stay did not differ significantly (MD -1.8 days, 95% CI -5.1 to 1.6). Those receiving additional rehabilitation had significantly higher step counts and spent significantly more time upright. Overall, the risk of adverse events was not increased by the provision of after-hours or weekend rehabilitation (RR 0.87, 95% CI 0.70 to 1.10). Conclusion: Additional after-hours rehabilitation can increase physical activity and may improve activities of daily living, but does not seem to affect the hospital length of stay. Review registration: PROSPERO CRD42014007648. [Scrivener K, Jones T, Schurr K, Graham PL, Dean CM (2015) After-hours or weekend rehabilitation improves outcomes and increases physical activity but does not affect length of stay: a systematic review.

LanguageEnglish
Pages61-67
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Physiotherapy
Volume61
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2015

Fingerprint

Length of Stay
Rehabilitation
Exercise
Activities of Daily Living
Inpatients
Meta-Analysis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Bibliographical note

Copyright 2015. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Erratum can be found in Journal of Physiotherapy volume 61(4), p173, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jphys.2015.08.008

Keywords

  • rehabilitation
  • physical activity
  • outcome
  • after hours
  • weekend

Cite this

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title = "After-hours or weekend rehabilitation improves outcomes and increases physical activity but does not affect length of stay: a systematic review",
abstract = "Question: In adults undergoing inpatient rehabilitation, does additional after-hours rehabilitation decrease length of stay and improve functional outcome, activities of daily living performance and physical activity? Design: Systematic review with meta-analysis of randomised trials. Participants: Adults participating in an inpatient rehabilitation program. Intervention: Additional rehabilitation provided after hours (evening or weekend). Outcome measures: Function was measured with tests such as the Motor Assessment Scale, 10-m walk test, the Timed Up and Go test, and Berg Balance Scale. Performance on activities of daily living was measured with the Barthel index or the Functional Independence Measure. Length of stay was measured in days. Physical activity levels were measured as number of steps or time spent upright. Standardised mean differences (SMD) or mean differences (MD) were used to combine these outcomes. Adverse events were summarised using relative risks (RR). Study quality was assessed using PEDro scores. Results: Seven trials were included in the review. All trials had strong methodological quality, scoring 8/10 on the PEDro scale. Among the measures of function, only balance showed a significant effect: the MD was 14 points better (95{\%} CI 5 to 23) with additional after-hours rehabilitation on a 0-to-56-point scale. The improvement in activities of daily living performance with additional after-hours rehabilitation was of borderline statistical significance (SMD 0.10, 95{\%} CI 0.00 to 0.21). Hospital length of stay did not differ significantly (MD -1.8 days, 95{\%} CI -5.1 to 1.6). Those receiving additional rehabilitation had significantly higher step counts and spent significantly more time upright. Overall, the risk of adverse events was not increased by the provision of after-hours or weekend rehabilitation (RR 0.87, 95{\%} CI 0.70 to 1.10). Conclusion: Additional after-hours rehabilitation can increase physical activity and may improve activities of daily living, but does not seem to affect the hospital length of stay. Review registration: PROSPERO CRD42014007648. [Scrivener K, Jones T, Schurr K, Graham PL, Dean CM (2015) After-hours or weekend rehabilitation improves outcomes and increases physical activity but does not affect length of stay: a systematic review.",
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N1 - Copyright 2015. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher. Erratum can be found in Journal of Physiotherapy volume 61(4), p173, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jphys.2015.08.008

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