Ambiguity and visual word recognition

Can feedback explain both homophone and polysemy effects?

Penny M. Pexman*, Stephen J. Lupker

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

73 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a lexical-decision task (LDT), Hino and Lupker (1996) reported a polysemy effect (faster response times for polysemous words [e.g., BANK]), and attributed this effect to enhanced feedback from the semantic system to orthographic units, for polysemous words. Using the same task, Pexman, Lupker, and Jared (in review) reported a homophone effect (slower response times for homophonic words [e.g., MAID]) and attributed this effect to inconsistent feedback from the phonological system to orthographic units, for homophones. In the present paper we test two predictions derived from this feedback explanation: Polysemy and homophone effects should (a) co-occur in a standard LDT (with pseudoword foils) and (b) both be larger with pseudohomophones (e.g., BRANE) as foils in LDT. The results supported both predictions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)323-334
Number of pages12
JournalCanadian Journal of Experimental Psychology
Volume53
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1999

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Ambiguity and visual word recognition: Can feedback explain both homophone and polysemy effects?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this