An adaptive thermal comfort policy for a geographically dispersed property portfolio; deciding when and where to air-condition in a warm climate zone

Richard De Dear, Christhina Candido

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper describes a Thermal Comfort Policy recently developed for a client who owns a large portfolio of buildings in Australia. To date the client's decisions about where and when to install HVAC have been based on a static isotherm on the climate map of the region in which they operate, regardless of how well the building performs. The client's brief aims to shift air conditioning decisions onto a more rational footing, based on the climatic context, the building's thermal performance and occupants' thermal comfort. The solution we proposed was based on ASHRAE's 55-2010R adaptive model, with an exponentially-weighted running mean outdoor temperature for input. Of the three different metrics proposed for the diagnosis of systematic overheating, the simplest was finally selected by the client (>1 % of occupied hours annually during which indoor temperature exceeds the ASHRAE 55 upper limit (80% acceptability).

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of 7th Windsor Conference: The Changing Context of Comfort in an Unpredictable World
Pages1-14
Number of pages14
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Event7th Windsor Conference: The Changing Context of Comfort in an Unpredictable World 2012 - Windsor, United Kingdom
Duration: 12 Apr 201215 Apr 2012

Other

Other7th Windsor Conference: The Changing Context of Comfort in an Unpredictable World 2012
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityWindsor
Period12/04/1215/04/12

Keywords

  • Adaptive comfort standards
  • Compliance
  • Exceedance
  • Heat-wave

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