An ecological approach to mapping remote creative practices: insights from an Australian Desert region

Brydie-Leigh Bartleet, Sarah Woodland, Naomi Sunderland, Sandy O'Sullivan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

There is increasing recognition that the creative arts sector has a crucial role to play in supporting and sustaining communities in remote contexts. However, there are still major gaps in understanding how this sector functions in such settings, and few resources to support the design and delivery of arts research in these contexts. To help address these gaps, this article draws on findings from a three-year project, Creative Barkly, the first study of its kind to adopt an ecological approach to mapping how the creative arts sector operates in one of Australia’s remotest regions. The article touches on five core principles that underpinned our approach to mapping creative practices in this region, reflecting a design that was (1) relationships-focused, (2) strengths-based, (3) co-designed, (4) accessible, and (5) community-engaged. Drawing on our experience of conducting this research in a complex remote Australian context, the article raises questions and opportunities for further research and policy making in arts for regional development.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages20
JournalCultural Trends
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 19 Jul 2021

Keywords

  • Creative arts sector
  • First Nations’ arts
  • creative mapping
  • ecological research approaches
  • regional development
  • remote Australia

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