"An example for corporate social responsibility": British American Tobacco's response to criticism of its Myanmar subsidiary, 1999-2003

Ross Mackenzie*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    1 Citation (Scopus)
    154 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    In 2013, British American Tobacco (BAT) returned to Myanmar a decade after it had left the country under pressure from civil society, international organizations, and the government of the United Kingdom. The company's involvement in a joint venture with an investment branch of the country's military government between 1999 and 2003 resulted in intense scrutiny and criticism based on the military's record of human rights abuses. BAT argued that corporations could not be held accountable for actions of governments in countries in which it operated, and that its presence in Myanmar contributed to economic and social development. It also maintained that its Myanmar subsidiary provided a model of responsible business conduct. The controversy that surrounded BAT's Myanmar subsidiary between 1999 and 2003 has increasing relevance to the current situation in Myanmar, and potential implications for foreign corporations operating in the country.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)298-312
    Number of pages15
    JournalAsia and the Pacific Policy Studies
    Volume5
    Issue number2
    Early online date2018
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - May 2018

    Bibliographical note

    Copyright the Author(s) 2018. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

    Keywords

    • Myanmar
    • tobacco industry
    • corporate social responsibility
    • human rights
    • framework convention on tobacco control

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