An international comparison study of pharmacy students’ achievement goals and their relationship to assessment type and scores

Saleh Alrakaf*, Claire Anderson, Sion A. Coulman, Dai N. John, June Tordoff, Erica Sainsbury, Grenville Rose, Lorraine Smith

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To identify pharmacy students’ preferred achievement goals in a multi-national undergraduate population, to investigate achievement goal preferences across comparable degree programs, and to identify relationships between achievement goals, academic performance, and assessment type. Methods: The Achievement Goal Questionnaire was administered to second year students in 4 universities in Australia, New Zealand, England, and Wales. Academic performance was measured using total scores, multiple-choice questions, and written answers (short essay). Results: Four hundred eighty-six second year students participated. Students showed an overall preference for the mastery-approach goal orientation across all sites. The predicted relationships between goal orientation and multiple-choice questions, and written answers scores, were significant. Conclusion: This study is the first of its kind to examine pharmacy students’ achievement goals at a multi-national level and to differentiate between assessment type and measures of achievement motivation. Students adopting a mastery-approach goal are more likely to gain high scores in assessments that measure understanding and depth of knowledge.

Original languageEnglish
Article number35
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican journal of pharmaceutical education
Volume79
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Apr 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Academic achievement
  • Achievement goals
  • Assessment type
  • Comparison study
  • Pharmacy education

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